So there is a problem with your new home – what can you do?

Recently, an attorney and freelance writer for realtor.com interviewed me. He asked many questions regarding what a homebuyer can do, if after they purchase a house, they find a major problem that was not disclosed by the seller. The title of the article is So there is a problem with your new home – what can you do? Written by Warren Christopher Freiberg. The issue presented was that a couple moved into their new home and found out it had major roof leakage issues. They did all the right things with getting a professional inspection but the problem was something that appeared to have been covered up and not disclosed by the sellers. The fact of the matter is, showing that the prior owner hid a defect is often easier said than done. In order to have any recourse, you have to prove that the seller knew about the problem and did not disclose it. The bottom line is that getting recourse from the seller can be an expensive legal battle that you may not win, and regardless of the legal complications the new owner also has to pay the fix the undisclosed problem in the meantime. It is a tough decision. Please read the full article at...
What you need to know about a home inspection report…

What you need to know about a home inspection report…

When you are buying a piece of real estate, I would highly recommend getting a certified home inspection on the property. A home inspection points out various problems with the land itself and with the house. Common problems that a home inspection reveals include: 1. Water damage – the obvious and the hidden 2. Mold 3. Dangerous levels of radon 4. Structural defects 5. Unsafe electrical conditions A lot of clients believe that they should ask for everything to be fixed that a home inspector finds to be wrong. That really is not the purpose of the home inspection contingency in the real estate contract. The main purpose is too find out if there are any safety hazards and to know whether the major components of the property are functioning properly. If you do find that any of the major components of the building are not functioning properly it gives the buyer a reason to cancel the contract with no repercussions. Although a home inspection report will list every minor thing that may be wrong with the home, the seller is not required to make minor or cosmetic repairs. I am not saying you can’t use the report as a bargaining tool. What I am saying is that you are not allowed to cancel a contract if the seller doesn’t fix all of the “small stuff.” They are only legally obligated to make repairs or replace major components of the real...